Jonas | Actor-Network Theory | Sociology of Calculation | Sociology of Economics (NEP-SOG) | Researching RePEc

 

RePEc bibliography

 

This is a list of RePEc related documents. They have been exported from EndNote and as you can see EndNote exports don't look that nice. A better formatted biblipgraphy can be found over at IDEAS but it includes documents about RePEc indexed in RePEc.

 

Zimmermann, C. (2008) Academic Rankings with RePEc University of Connecticut, Department of Economics Working papers http://ideas.repec.org/p/uct/uconnp/2008-17.html

We study how the democratization of the diffusion of research through the Internet could have helped non traditional fields of research. The specific case we approach is Heterodox Economics as its pre-prints are disseminated through NEP, the email alert service of RePEc. Comparing heterodox and mainstream papers, we find that heterodox ones are quite systematically more downloaded, and particularly so when considering downloads per subscriber. We conclude that the Internet definitely helps heterodox research, also because other researcher get exposed to it. But there is still room for more participation by heterodox researchers.

Bergstrom, T. C. and R. Lavaty (2007). How often do economists self-archive?, Department of Economics, UCSB. http://repositories.cdlib.org/ucsbecon/bergstrom/2007a

To answer the question of the paper's title, we looked at the tables of contents from two recent issues of 33 economics journals and attempted to find a freely available online version of each article. We found that about 90 percent of articles in the most-cited economics journals and about 50 percent of articles in less-cited journals are available. We conduct a similar exercise for political science and find that only about 30 percent of the articles are freely available. The paper reports a regression analysis of the effects of author and article characteristics on likelihood of posing and it discusses the implications of self-archiving for the pricing of subscription-based academic journals.

Medoff , M. H. (2006). "The efficiency of self-citations in economics." Scientometrics 69(1): 69-84. http://www.springerlink.com/content/j421754hnpk31864/

Are prior self-citations an effective input in increasing a subsequent article's citation count? Examination of 418 articles in eight economics journals found that, after controlling for article length, journal and author quality, lead article position, and coauthorship, an author's prior stock of self-citations is not statistically related to a subsequent article's total citation count or the quality of the journals in which those citations appear. Self-citations that appear in prestigious high-impact economics journals have a statistically positive, but numerically small, effect on a subsequent article's total citation count and on the quality of the citing journal. The productive effect of a prior self-citation is inversely related to its age. Prior self-citations of the second author listed in a collaborative article have no significant effect on a subsequent article's total citation count or the quality of the economics journals in which those citations appear.

Bakkalbasi, N. and T. Krichel (2006) Patterns of research collaboration in a large digital library http://openlib.org/home/krichel/papers/elba.pdf

RePEc (Research Papers in Economics) has been conceived and developed to promote scholarly communication and enhance the dissemination of research findings in the field of economics. RePEc offers the RePEc Author Service (RAS) where economics authors can claim authorship of the research papers that are described in RePEc archives. The data from this service forms a high-quality authorship database. We use this data to answer a variety of questions about RAS registrants such as the number of papers they write, the number of collaborators they have, etc. We investigate the structure of research collaborations within RePEc by applying social network analysis to the co-authorship network formed by RAS data. We perform a component size analysis and calculate centrality metrics. We also compare and contrast results from a number of recent studies on co-authorship networks.

Ojala, M. (2005). Searching for Economics; Joking with Economists. Online, Information Today Inc. 29: 42. http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bsh&an=16178231

This article provides information on electronic information resources on economics in the U.S. The traditional bastion of scholarly literature in economics has been EconLit, the database of the American Economics Association. It indexes six document types: journal articles, books, collective volume articles, dissertations, working papers and book reviews. It is not just an index database, but also contains abstracts and some full text. NetEc, the network for economists, began as an international academic effort to improve the communication of economics via electronic media and took full advantage of Internet technology. The scholarly literature in economics frequently involves working papers, the pre-prints of the academic economic research community. These working papers are collected in RePEc, which is a free, open access source. The largest contributors are listed at the site and include universities, publishers and governmental bodies. The National Association for Business Economics acts as a portal to the profession. Not only does it provide on its home page news of interest to economists, it also has links to useful and interesting information in the field of business economics.

Krichel, T. and C. Zimmermann (2005). The Economics of Open Bibliographic Data Provision, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics, Working papers: 2005-01. http://ideas.repec.org/p/uct/uconnp/2005-01.html

In this paper, we discuss the provision of bibliographic data as an extension of the open source concept. Our particular concern is the sustainability of such endeavors. We describe the RePEc (Research Papers in Economics) project, probably the largest "open source" bibliographic database. It demonstrates that open-source bibliographic data collection is sustainable.

Krichel, T. and N. Bakkalbasi (2005). "Developing a predictive model of editor selectivity in a current awareness service of a large digital library." Library & Information Science Research 27(4): 440. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/B6W5R-4HG6H9S-2/2/399a31075bf98221e3f3149f9d2b4e52

Krichel, T. and N. Bakkalbasi (2005) Metadata characteristics as predictors for editor selectivity in a current awareness service http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00003116/

RePEc is a large digital library for the economics community. “NEP: New Economics Papers” is a current awareness service for recent additions to RePEc. The service is run by volunteer editors. They filter new additions to RePEc into subject-specific reports. The intended purpose of this current awareness service is to filter papers by subject matter without any judgment of their academic quality. We use binary logistic regression analysis to estimate the probability of a paper being included in any of the subject reports as a function of a range of observable variables. Our analysis suggests that, contrary to their own claims, editors use quality criteria. These include the reputation of the series as well as the reputation of the authors. Our findings suggest that a current awareness service can be used as a first step of a peer-review process.

Krichel, T. and N. Bakkalbasi (2005). Developing a predictor model of editor selectivity in a current awareness service of a large digital library. http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00003431/

“NEP: New Economics Papers,” the current awareness service for the RePEc (Research Papers in Economics) digital library, is made possible by volunteer editors who filter new additions to RePEc into subject-specific reports. The official purpose of current awareness service is to filter working papers by subject matter without any judgment of its academic quality. In this article binary logistic regression analysis estimates the probability of a paper being included in any of the subject reports as a function of a range of observable values. The analysis suggests that, contrary to their claims, editors use quality criteria: the series the paper is coming from and the reputation of the authors. The findings suggest that a current awareness service can issue quality signals.

Baum, C. (2005). bejeap2.pl, a script converting OAI data to ReDIF with Unicode support, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/bejeap2.html

This perl program uses OAI compliant data to export ReDIF data used in RePEc. This version is adapted for the OAI data contributed (and web-accessible) by bepress (Berkeley Electronic Press). It improves on bejeap.pl by incorporating UTF8 input and output to provide better support for accented characters, and making use of OAI resumptionTokens for multiple chunks of data returned by listRecords.

Batiz-Lazo, B. and T. Krichel (2005). "On-line distribution of working papers through NEP: A Brief Business History." http://www.btinternet.com/~bbatiz/NEP/NEPhistory2.pdf

This brief article tells of the emergence and development of a service for speedy, on-line distribution of recent additions to the broad literatures on economics and related areas called NEP: New Economics Papers. This service is part of a wider project called RePEc. RePEc is a digital library for the Economics discipline. Details are also provided on how to make individual and institutional contributions.

Parinov, S. and T. Krichel (2004). RePEc and Socionet as partners in a changing digital library environment, 1997 to 2004 and beyond. Russian Conference on Digital Libraries. Pushchino, Russia. http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00001830/01/bonn.pdf

This paper examines the theoretical foundation and practical development of the the RePEc and Socionet.ru digital libraries. RePEc is a UK-founded but internationally operating digital library for the economics discipline. Socionet is a Russia-based, but multi-disciplinary digital library for the wider social sciences. In 1997, Socionet copied the business model of RePEc and much of its technical infrastructure. As the Socionet library has matured, it has diverged from the RePEc model. Currently it emerges as a model and platform to build the Russian national level scientific and educational digital information space.

Krichel, T. and M. E. D. Koenig (2004). From open access to open libraries: claims and visions for Open Academic Libraries. International Conference of Digital Library: Advance the Efficiency of Knowledge Utilization.

This paper discusses the concept of the "Open Academic Library". The idea refers to a freely available metadata set about academic publications. The paper discusses emmergence and sustainability of such libraries.

Krichel, T. (2004) Altai paper http://openlib.org/home/krichel/work/altai.html

"Altai paper", written to document "ernad", a software suite to aid current awareness reports such as NEP

Jacso, P. (2004). "Google Scholar Beta " Péter's Digital Reference Shelf from http://www.gale.com/servlet/HTMLFileServlet?imprint=9999&region=7&fileName=/reference/archive/200412/googlescholar.html.

Jacso, P. (2004). IDEAS, LogEc, EconLit. Online, Information Today Inc. 28: 57. http://search.epnet.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=bsh&an=13798786

This article highlights several implementations of the Research Papers in Economics (RePEc) archive, which is being implemented with different features by talented economists and programmers in many countries as varied as Sweden, Russia, Britain and the U.S. IDEAS is one of the many excellent implementations of the RePEc collection of free abstracts for more than 200,000 journal articles, working papers, books, book chapters and software. Over half of the abstracts have links to the full-text digital version. The other pick is a spectacularly well-implemented bibliometric service that delivers very informative statistics about the papers, journals, series and authors in RePEc. The pan is the American Economic Association's EconLit database, which is widely licensed by many college libraries and research centers, but is becoming increasingly less and less state of the art. The popularity of the RePEc archive and its services is superbly illustrated by the LogEc service, run by Sune Karlsson at the Economic Research Institute of the Stockholm School of Economics, which analyzes the server logs of the participating RePEc servers. EconLit is produced by the American Economic Association and available on many commercial online services, including CSA, Dialog, EBSCO, OCLC, Ovid, Science Direct and Silver Platter.

Greiner , B. (2004). RePEcPHP, a PHP and MySQL web interface to maintain a RePEc archive, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/repecphp.html

RePEcPHP is a free PHP and MySQL based web interface to maintain a RePEc archive. The RePEc project provides a volunteer-driven public-access database of more than 100,000 working papers plus other items. With RePEcPHP providers of working paper series are able to easily do their work via a comfortable web interface. A customizable series homepage is automatically created, including a search form. RePEcPHP can create the documents in ReDIF format parsed by the RePEc robot either on the fly or via a one-button click. All data fields used in the standard ReDIF templates for working paper series are supported. An import function is provided to read in existing archives.

Goffe, W. L. (2004) The Internet and the American Economic Association -- A Set of Proposals http://wueconb.wustl.edu/~goffe/fut.2.pdf

The Internet poses numerous short- and long-term opportunities and challenges for almost all the operations of the American Economic Association. This paper examines these challenges and proposes various actions. In general terms, the AEA should first adapt its operations to maintain a constant level of service to its members in this changing environment. Second, the AEA charter calls for the “encouragement of perfect freedom of economic discussion,” and the cost-reducing promise of the Internet and associated computer technologies brings us closer to this goal, but their full potential requires their adoption by the AEA. Finally, the AEA is uniquely positioned as a large, capable non-profit to implement these new services.

Canos, J. H., M. Llavador, et al. (2004). "A service-oriented framework for bibliography management." D-Lib Magazine 10(11): No page numbers. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/november04/canos/11canos.html

The full text of this electronic journal article can be found at [URL:http://www.dlib.org/dlib/november04/canos/11canos.html]. Despite the importance of bibliographies in scientific/technical documents, a global solution to the bibliography management problem has still not been developed. Current solutions are limited in the sense that they are word-processor oriented, whereas users must often write documents with different tools. This obligates authors to use different bibliography managers, and even different collections (with subsequent problems such asconsistency enforcement, updating, etc.) depending on the word processor used. In this article, we introduce Bibshare, a new framework for bibliography management that allows writers to use the same bibliography collection(s) regardless of the word processing system they use. Moreover, both personal and external collections can be used to retrievethe bibliographic information to be inserted into documents. Bibshareis an example of the new generation of applications that have been built using a ServiceOriented approach. It is open and extensible so newcollections and word processors can be added in a straightforward way. In addition, it is available free of charge. This article outlines the architecture of Bibshare and enumerates some of Bibshare's features, emphasizing its federated search service. (Original abstract)

Barrueco Cruz, J. M. and T. Krichel (2004). Building an autonomous citation index for grey literature : the economics working papers case. GL6: Sixth International Conference on Grey Literature. New York. http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00003072/

This paper describes an autonomous citation index named CitEc that has been developed by the authors. The system has been tested using a particular type of grey literature: working papers available in the RePEc (Research Papers in Economics) digital library. Both its architecture and performance are analysed in order to determine if the system has the quality required to be used for information retrieval and for the extraction of bibliometric indicators.

Anil, K. and V. L. Kalyane (2004). Bibliographics for the 983 eprints in the live archives of E-LIS : trends and status report up to 7th July 2004, based on author-self-archiving metadata. http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00001927/

The priority for ideas and philosophy related to "Network Theory" have been traced back and documented by Braun(2004),and credit goes to Karinthy(1929).The IT has empowered to realise it, as the most practical phenomena and it is no more a humour. The OAI (Open Archives Initiatives)and ACIS (Academic Contributor Information System)are progressive in the direction ,which may lead to realise the "Collective Genius" at global level. Focus of present study is on Author-Self-Archiving (A-S-A)Metadata of the 983 Eprints in the Live Archives of the E-LIS (EPrints of Library and Information Science),which were approved till 7th July 2004.The A-S-A Metadata was used for librametric analysis. Self-explanatory bibliographics are illustrated.The highlights include: Conference papers (34%); highest approval, June 2004 (28%); published archives (76%);not refereed (52%); not in public domain (60%); highest self-archiving-author (De Robbio, Antonella).The Nos. of EPrints having single JITA domain specifications were: Theoretical and general aspects of libraries and information(27); Information use and sociology of information(80);Users,literacy and reading(13);Libraries as physical collections(30);Publishing and legal issues(57);Management(13);Industry, profession and education(36);Information sources, supports, channels(113) ; Information treatment for information services, Information functions and techniques (101); Technical services libraries, archives and museums(25); Housing technologies(1); Information technology and library technology(92); and Inter-domainery (395) i.e. having specifications of two or more than two JITA classes.

Pinfield, S. (2003). "Open archives and UK institutions: an overview." D-Lib Magazine 9(3): No page numbers. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march03/pinfield/03pinfield.html

The full text of this electronic journal article can be found at [URL:http://www.dlib.org/dlib/march03/pinfield/03pinfield.html]. Provides a brief overview of current activity in the development of open archives (particularly ePrint repositories) within UK universities and similar institutions and discusses some of the issues the open archives activity is raising. One initial issue that has arisen as the idea of self-archiving has begun to take root is the problem of ambiguous terminology. There is considerable confusion, particularly amongst practitioners who are new to the field. Whilst many proponents of the open archives initiative (OAI) are also advocates of open access, it should be recognized that the two do not necessarily have to go together. It is possible to use the OAI protocol in a closed-access environment and it is possible to have open access without the OAI. (Quotes from original text)

McKiernan, G. (2003). "E-profile: scholar based innovations in publishing. Part 1: individual and institutional initiatives." Library Hi Tech News 20(2): 19-26. http://miranda.emeraldinsight.com/vl=2409436/cl=23/nw=1/rpsv/cgi-bin/linker?ini=emerald&reqidx=/cw/mcb/07419058/v20n2/s7005/p5l

This is the first of three e-Profiles on scholar-based innovations inpublishing. Headed "individual" it reports on: arXiv.org e-print archive, an Internet-based service enabling authors to store and access pre-publication versions of their work from a central location. Currently the archive (xxx.arXiv.cornell.edu) consists of 4 major collections - physics, mathematics, nonlinear sciences and computer science; Cogprints (cogprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk), launched in 1997, described as a cognitive sciences e-print server for self-archiving papers in any area of psychology, neoscience, linguistics and many areas of computer science; and RePEc (Research Papers in Economics - repec.org), a collaborative effort of over 100 volunteers in 30 countries to enhance the dissemination of research in economics. Headed "institutional" it reports on: eScholarship Repository [URL:http://repositories.edlib.org/escholarship]

Dobratz, S. and B. Matthaei (2003). "Open archives activities and experiences in Europe: an overview by the Open Archives Forum." D-Lib Magazine 9(1): No page numbers. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january03/dobratz/01dobratz.html

The full text of this electronic journal article can be found at [URL:http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january03/dobratz/01dobratz.html]. Reports on the current activities of the Open Archives Forum, a clustering activity that targets existing open archives communities, as well as new communities, like IST projects or national initiatives planning or initiating open archives. The Open Archives Forum is a dissemination activity that aims to manage an exchange of experiences on open archives in general. The project investigates the usage of open archives under different paradigms and its aims are to make digital repositories more widely available, make them globally accessible, encourage people to share developments, and enable developing countries to obtain access to scientific and cultural heritage information. The Open Archives Forum project supports established metadata repositories and supports new open archive data providers from communities such as cultural heritage institutions, museums, European digitization projects, research organizations, educational institutions, public libraries, community organizations and publishers as well as the commercial sector. (Quotes from original text)

Chu, H. and T. Krichel (2003). Current Awareness Service of the RePEc Digital Library: Progress, Performance and Potentials. Chinese Academy of Sciences Symposium on the Libraries' Sustainable Development & Innovation. Beijing, China. http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00000434/

Chu, H. and T. Krichel (2003). "NEP: current awareness service of the RePEc Digital Library." D-Lib Magazine 9(12): No page numbers. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/december03/chu/12chu.html

The full text of this electronic journal article can be found at [URL:http://www.dlib.org/dlib/december03/chu/12chu.html]. NEP (New Economics Papers) is a current awareness service for the RePEc (Research Papers in Economics) digital library. Since its initiation in 1998, over 56 individual lists have been created to loosely represent subfields withineconomics. Those lists in total made more than 37,000 announcements of about 28,000 working papers that were added to RePEc in the past five years. With several kinds of data available for NEP from May 1998 through June 2003, this study examines the development of the NEP service. The performance of NEP is then measured in terms of timeliness, coverage ratio, and usage. In exploring the various NEP parameters and their relationships, we discuss the potentials and other perspectives ofthe NEP service. Although it can be further improved, NEP could become an innovative model for current awareness services of digital libraries technically as well as organizationally. (Original abstract)

Buckholtz, A., R. Dekeyser, et al. (2003). Open Access: Restoring Scientific Communication to its Rightful Owners, European Science Foundation. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/papers/SPB21_OAI.pdf

Baum, C. and L. Meyer (2003). bejeap.pl, a script converting OAI data to ReDIF, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/bejeap.html

This perl program uses OAI compliant data to export ReDIF data used in RePEc. This version is adapted for the OAI data contributed (and web-accessible) by BEPress.

Barrueco Cruz, J. M., J. C. Trinidad, et al. (2003). Human-mediated current awareness in a large digital library. I Jornadas de Tratamiento y Recuperación de la Información. Leganés, Spain.

Barrueco Cruz, J. M. and I. Subirats Coll (2003). RCLIS: towards a digital library for Information Science. Libraries in Digital Age (LIDA). Dubrovnik and Mljet (Croatia). http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00000352/

In this paper we present a case study of a digital library specialised in Information Science: RCLIS. Our aim is to describe the main characteristics of a project in which we have been working for more than three years. RCLIS (Research in Computing, Library and Information Science) is an international co-operative effort to develop a digital library for Information Science. The initiative has two main objectives. Firstly, it tries to compile and to place in the public domain metadata about research documents. The data is freely available for public and private, commercial and no-commercial, purposes. It will also serve as a testbed for digital library research. Secondly to facilitate the access to the freely documents available on the Internet, in order to increase their visibility. RCLIS deals with traditional documents like conference proceedings, articles published in journals and research reports.

Barrueco Cruz, J. M., T. Krichel, et al. (2003). Organizing current awareness in a large digital library. Conference on Users in the Electronic Information Environments. Espoo, Finland. http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00000368/

This paper presents and analyses “NEP: New Economics Papers”, the current awareness service of the RePEc digital library. NEP is a human-mediated service. New items arriving in RePEc are examined by editors of subject-specific reports. This paper introduces NEP from a conceptual point of view and communicates how NEP fits into the evolving world of digital libraries. We then present summary statistics for the performance of NEP. We pay particular attention to the coverage ratio, and the redundancy of reports. Suggestions for improving the performance of NEP are discussed.

Barrueco Cruz, J. M. and T. Krichel (2003). Subject description in the Academic Metadata Format. VI Congreso del Capítulo Español de ISKO. Salamanca (Spain). http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00000178/

In this paper we deal with the problem of classification coding in a metadata format called AMF (Academic Metadata Format). AMF emphases the separate description of persons and institutions. AMF is encoded in XML. In general, subject classification representation using XML is still in an initial research status. We present here several alternatives that could be used to carry out this task.

Parks, R. P. (2002) The Faustian Grip of Academic Publishing http://ideas.repec.org/p/wpa/wuwpmi/0202005.html

The journal acquisition budget of libraries is not increasing at the same rate as subscription rates creating the serials' crisis. Many solutions have been proposed including the freely available electronic journal. However, all the solutions suffer the same Faustian Grip - namely that the actors in the academic publishing game have little or no incentive to stop publishing in the current journals. We examine those incentives concluding that even with a better more efficient technology, the actors will not change from the current academic publishing institution, and the serials' crisis will remain.

Parks, R. P. (2002). "The Faustian Grip of Academic Publishing." Journal of Economic Methodology 9(3): 317-35. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/1350178022000015122

The journal acquisition budget of libraries is not increasing at the same rate as subscription rates, creating the serials crisis. Many solutions have been proposed including the freely available electronic journal. However, all the solutions suffer the same Faustian grip--namely that the actors in the academic publishing game have little or no incentive to stop publishing in the current journals. We examine those incentives concluding that even with a better, more efficient technology, the actors will not change from the current academic publishing institution, and the serials crisis will remain.

Nelson, M. L. and B. D. Allen (2002). "Object persistence and availability in digital libraries." D-Lib Magazine 8(1): No page numbers. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january02/nelson/01nelson.html

The full text of this electronic journal article can be found at [URL:http://www.dlib.org/dlib/january02/nelson/01nelson.html]. Reports results of a study of object persistence and availability of 1,000 digital library (DL) objects. Twenty World Wide Web accessible DLs were chosen and from each DL, 50 objects were chosen at random. A script checked the availability of each object three times a week for just over one year for a total of 161 data samples. During this time span, it was found that 31 objects (3 per cent of the total) appear not to be available (24 from PubMed Central, 5 from IDEAS, 1 from CogPrints, and 1 from ETD). (Original abstract - amended)

Levine, D. K. (2002). wjecon.php3, a script converting ReDIF data to html, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/wjecon.html

The PHP software used to generate the page from RePEc data. o use the program, unzip it and edit the wjecon.conf file to suit yourself (the options are reasonably self-documenting). Then run wjecon.php3 by invoking a command-line php interpreter as php -q wjecon.php3 >name_of_your_html_file.htm If you want, you can run this every night using cron or the windows task scheduler. It creates an html file with the list of papers from RePEc. You can change the jpg files to images of your own choice; same with the style-sheet wjecon.css. The html files were generated using the php files and are included to show what you are supposed to get when you are successful. The penn/princeton-rdf.* files are used to generate rdf-like data for the penn and princeton theory working papers from their web data since they don't provide proper RePEc data. If you need to index a series that isn't found on RePEc you might want to look at these programs to see how they work. See http://www.dklevine.com/wjecon/wjecon.htm for results.

Krichel, T. and S. M. Warner (2002). Open Archives and Free Online Scholarship. Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2002. Portland, Oregon, USA. http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00000374/

The potential for free access to scholarly documents on the Internet continues to occupy the minds of all actors in scholarly communication. While there is much agreement that free access is desirable, there is little agreement about how this will come about. We have been actively involved in this transition through our work on two major initiatives in this area. These are arXiv, which covers Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science and RePEc, which covers Economics. We discuss the Open Archives Initiative (OAI) and the Academic Metadata Format (AMF). These discussions inform our proposal of a conceptual framework for the transition to free online scholarship. We pay particular attention to the rôle that digital libraries play in the transition process.

Kling, R., L. Spector, et al. (2002). "Locally controlled scholarly publishing via the Internet: the Guild Model." JEP: the Journal of Electronic Publishing 8(1): No page numbers. http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/08-01/kling.html

The full text of this electronic journal article can be found at [URL:http://www.press.umich.edu/jep/08-01/kling.html]. The Internet is widely viewed as a potential facilitator of scholarly communication, including communication via research articles. There is considerable debate about which publishing models should organize these communications. Some often proposed candidates include: field-wide e-print repositories, free online access to all peer-reviewed literature, peer-reviewed pure-electronic journals, hybrid paper-electronic journals, and authors posting their articles on their own web sites. Several of these models, such as authors self-posting and e-print repositories have no direct paper precursors. Only one of these five major architectures has become dominant across a variety of scholarly fields: the hybrid paper-electronic journal, which is a conservative extension of the traditional paper journal. Examines this model, which is based on the practice of academic departments and research institutes publishing their own locally controlled series of working papers, technical reports, research memoranda, and occasional papers, and suggests another model, the guild publishing model (GPM), which is based on the relatively well-understood concept of the research manuscript series sponsored by some academic departments and research institutes. Benefits of the GPM include: rapid access to new research, quality indicators through restricted guild membership, localized, easy setup, compatibility with other forms of online and journal publishing, and relatively low cost. (Quotes from original text)

Braslavsky, P. I. and T. Krichel (2002). OAI and AMF for academic self-documentation. Russian Digital Library Conference. Dubna - Russia. http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00000436/

This paper examines the Open Archives Initiative (OAI) and the Academic Metadata Format (AMF). The Open Archives Initiative Protocol (OAI-PMH) provides a technical framework for the harvesting of metadata contents. The main feature and advantage of the protocol is that is relatively (compared to say Z39.50) easy to implement. The Academic Metadata Format(AMF)is a modular metadata model for academic authors, institutions, documents, and collections of documents. It uses standard vocabularies wherever possible and simply builds an XML framework for their usage. AMF can be used to build descriptions of complete academic disciplines that relate authors to their institutions, to the documents that they have written and to the organization of documents into collections. The RePEc and Socionet projects can serve as examples of the described approach.

Baum , C. (2002). cdl-ciders.pl, a script converting XML data to ReDIF, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/cdl-ciders.html

This perl program grabs XML data from an OAI archive (California Digital Library, maintained by bepress.com) and generates the ReDIF data used in RePEc for a specific CDL publications series.

Barrueco Cruz, J. M. and T. Krichel (2002). Co-usage of documents in a large digital library. Fourth Delos Workshop. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/papers/kumegawa.a4.pdf

The RePEc Economics library offers the largest distributed source of freely downloadable scientific research reports in the world. WoPEc is a user services of that library. It operates on the Internet since 1993. It has a well-established user community, and a relatively narrow subject coverage. In this paper, we wish to find out which papers in the collection are similar through usage. The idea is that if different users request a couple of papers consistently together, then these papers are likely to correspond to the same information needs. They are similar in this sense. We present a theoretical discussion of these relationships and an empirical assessment. We introduce a measure of co-usage and estimate results for the WoPEc user service.

Barrueco Cruz, J. M. and T. Krichel (2002). Automatic extraction of citation data in a distributed academic digital library. Second Workshop on New Developments in Digital Libraries. Ciudad Real, Spain. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/papers/ciudadreal.pdf

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Brody, T. D., Z. Jiao, et al. (2001-). Vocabulary and Syntax of the Academic Metadata Format. http://amf.openlib.org/doc/ebisu.html

This document is a draft for the Academic Metadata Format (AMF)

Warner, S. M. and T. Krichel (2001). Disintermediation of Academic Publishing through the Internet: An Intermediate Report from the Front Line. ICCC/IFIP 5th Conference on Electronic Publishing. Canterbury, UK. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/papers/sants.html

There has been a lot of discussion about the potential for free access to scholarly documents on the Internet. At the turn of the century, there are two major initiatives. These are arXiv, which covers Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science and RePEc, which covers Economics. These initiatives work in very different ways. This paper is the fruit of collaboration between authors working for both initiatives. It therefore reflects the perspective of people working to achieve change, rather than an academic perspective of pure observation. We first introduce both arXiv and RePEc, and then consider future scenarios for disintermediated academic publishing. We then discuss the issue of quality control from an e-print archive point of view. Finally, we review recent efforts to improve the interoperability of e-print archives through the Open Archive Initative (OAI). In particular, we draw on the workshop on OAI and peer review held at CERN in March 2001 to illustrate the level of interest in the OAI protocol as a way to improve scholarly commonication on the Internet.

Warner, S. M. and T. Krichel (2001). A metadata framework to support scholarly communication. International Conference on Dublin Core and Metadata Applications 2001. Tokyo, Japan. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/papers/kanda.html

In this paper, we consider the design of a new metadata format to advance scholarly communication over the Internet. This format is designed to be used within the Open Archives Initiative. It is based on work by the Dublin Core Metadata Initiative and others. We present a requirements analysis and then propose a conceptual framework for the metadata. We examine metadata quality control and assess the role of the Resource Description Framework.

Van de Sompel, H. and O. Beit-Arie (2001). "Generalizing the OpenURL Framework beyond references to scholarly works. The Bison-Fute Model." D-Lib Magazine 7(7/8): No page numbers. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july01/vandesompel/07vandesompel.html

The full text of this electronic journal article can be found at [URL:http://www.dlib.org/dlib/july01/vandesompel /07vandesompel.html]. Introduces the Bison-Fute model, a conceptual generalization of the OpenURL framework for open and context-sensitive reference linking in the World Wide Web based scholarly information environment. The Bison-Fute model is an abstract framework that identifies and defines components that are required to enable open and context-sensitive linking on the web in general. It is derived from experience gathered from the deployment of the OpenURL framework over the course of the past year. It is a generalization of the current OpenURL framework in several aspects. It aims to extend the scope of open and context-sensitive linking beyond Web based scholarly information. In addition, it offers a generalization of the manner in which referenced items, as well as the context in which these items are referenced, can be described for the specific purpose of open and context-sensitive linking. The Bison-Fute model is not suggested as a replacement of the OpenURL framework. On the contrary, it confirms the conceptual foundations of the OpenURL framework and, at the same time, it suggests directions and guidelines as to how the current OpenURL specifications could be extended to become applicable beyond the scholarly information environment. (Original abstract)

Walshe, E. (2001). "Creating an academic self-documentation system through digital library interoperability: the RePEc model." New Review of Information Networking 7: 43-58.

Contribution to a thematic issue on interoperability. Cooperative cataloguing and collaborative resource description have a long and distinguished tradition in library services. The ubiquitous nature of the Internet presents new possibilities for the effective sharing of bibliographic data; imparts a more synergetic relationship between resource origin, description, and delivery; and represents the vanguard for a paradigmatic shift in library work. Discusses an effort led by Thomas Krichel to improve the resource description of scientific papers and their authorities in the field of economics. The RePEc Economics Library provides access to the largest distributed source of freely disseminated scientific preprints in the world. (Original abstract - amended)

Pinfield, S. (2001). "How do physicists use an e-print archive?" D-Lib Magazine 7(12): No page numbers. http://www.dlib.org/dlib/december01/pinfield/12pinfield.html

The full text of this electronic journal article can be found at [URL:http://www.dlib.org/dlib/december01/pinfield /12pinfield.html]. It has been suggested that institutional electronic reprint (e-print) services will become an important way of achieving the wide availability of e-prints across a broad range of subject disciplines. However, as yet there are few exemplars of this sort of service. Describes how physicists make use of an established centralized subject-based e-prints service, arXiv and discusses the possible implications of this use for institutional multidisciplinary e-print archives. A number of key points are identified, including technical issues (such as file formats and user interface design), management issues (such as submission procedures and administrative staff support), economic issues (such as installation and support costs), quality issues (such as peer review and quality control criteria), policy issues (such as digital preservation and collection development standards), academic issues (such as scholarly communication cultures and publishing trends), and legal issues (such as copyright and intellectual property rights). These are discussed with reference to the project to set up a pilot institutional e-print service at Nottingham University, UK. This project is being used as a pragmatic way of investigating the issues surrounding institutional e-print services, particularly in seeing how flexible the e-prints model actually is and how easily it can adapt itself to disciplines other than physics. (Original abstract - amended)

Parinov, S. I. and T. Krichel (2001). The RePEc database and its Russian partner Socionet. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/papers/tri_voksal.letter.pdf

After arXiv.org, the RePEc economics library offers the second-largest library of freely downloadable scientific papers in the world. RePEc has a different business model and a different content coverage than arXiv.org. This paper addresses both differences. Published in Russian Digital Libraries Journal vol. 5, no. 2

McKiernan, G. (2001). "RePEc: An Open Library for Economics." Library Hi Tech News(3): 21-31. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/doc/mckiernan_lhtn.doc

Krichel, T. and S. M. Warner (2001). Academic self-documentation: which way forward for computing, library and information science? ICADL2001. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/mitaka.html

Krichel, T. (2001). RePEc, an Open Library for Economics. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/salisbury.letter.pdf

Guildford, G. X. and T. Krichel (2001). Working towards an Open Library for Economics: The RePEc project. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/myers.a4.pdf

After arXiv.org, the RePEc Economics library offers the second-largest source of freely downloadable scientific preprints in the world. RePEc has a different business model and a different content coverage than arXiv.org. This paper addresses both differences. As far as the business model is concerned, RePEc is an instance of a concept that I call the "Open Library". An Open Library is open in two ways. It is open for contribution (third parties can add to it), and it is open for implementation (many user services may be created). Conventional libraries---including most digital libraries---are closed in both directions. As far as the content coverage is concerned, RePEc seeks to build a relational dataset about scholarly resources and other aspects of reality that are related to these resources. This basically means identifying all authors, all papers and all institutions that work in economics. Such an ambitious project can only be achieved if the cost to collect metadata is decentralized and low, and if the benefits to supply metadata are large. The Open Library provides a framework where these conditions are fulfilled. This paper is available online at http://openlib.org/home/krichel/myers.html. # The work discussed here has received financial support by the Joint Information Systems Committee of the UK Higher Education Funding Councils through its Electronic Library Programme I am grateful to Ivan V. Kurmanov for comments on an earlier version. This paper was presented at the PEAK conference at the University of Michigan on 2000--03--24. On 2001--03--05, I made cosmetic changes to this document as suggested by Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason. These suggestions have much improved the readability of the paper without updating its contents.

Baum, C. (2001). aer.pl, a script converting XML data to ReDIF, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/aer.html

This perl program grabs XML data and generates the ReDIF data used in RePEc. This version is adapted for the XML data contributed (and web-accessible) by the American Economic Review.

Van de Sompel, H. and C. Lagoze (2000). "The Santa Fe Convention of the Open Archives initiative." D-Lib Magazine 6(2). http://www.dlib.org/dlib/february00/vandesompel-ups/02vandesompel-ups.html

The Open Archives initiative (OAi) promotes and encourages the development of author self-archiving solutions (also commonly called e-print systems) through the development of technical mechanisms and organizational structures to support interoperability of e-print archives. Such interoperability can stimulate the transition of e-print systems into genuine building blocks of a transformed scholarly communication model. This paper describes the Santa Fe Convention of the OAi. This is a set of relatively simple but potentially quite powerful interoperability agreements that facilitate the creation of mediator services. These services combine and process information from individual archives and offer increased functionality to support discovery, presentation and analysis of data originating from compliant archives. (Original abstract)

Van de Sompel, H., T. Krichel, et al. (2000). "The UPS Prototype. An experimental end-user service across e-print archives." D-Lib Magazine 6(2). http://www.dlib.org/dlib/february00/vandesompel-oai/02vandesompel-oai.html

A meeting was held in Santa Fe, New Mexico, October 21-22, 1999, to generate discussion and consensus about interoperability of publicly available scholarly information archives. The invitees represented several well known e-print and report archive initiatives, as well as organizations with interests in digital libraries and the transformation of scholarly communication. The central goal of the meeting was to agree on recommendations that would make the creation of end-user services, such as scientific search engines and linking systems for data originating from distributed and dissimilar archives, easier. The Universal Preprint Service (UPS) prototype is a proof-of-concept of a multi-discipline digital library of publicly available scholarly material, which harvested nearly 200,000 records from several different archives and created an attractive end user environment. Describes the results of the project in two ways. On the one hand, the experimental end user service that was created during the project is illustrated and on the other hand, the lessons that the project team drew from the experience of creating the prototype are presented. (Original abstract)

Mili, F. (2000). "Trends in publishing academic grey literature: examples from economics." International Journal on Grey Literature 1(4): 157-166. http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mcb/246/2000/00000001/00000004/art00002

What impact might electronic publishing have on grey literature? This work tries to give some answers based on changes in the publishing of economics research preprints or working-paper series. Institutions and some members of the economics community have created archives to facilitate access to working paper series. In this document, we evaluate the prospects for electronic publishing of economics preprints using an inventory of material available from institutions' web sites. Also the paper contains an overview of some working-paper archives managed by economists.

Krichel, T. (2000). Working towards an Open Library for Economics: The RePEc project. PEAK 2000 Conference: The Economics and Use of Digital Library Collections. University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/myers.html

After arXiv.org, the RePEc Economics library offers the second-largest source of freely downloadable scientific preprints in the world. RePEc has a different business model and a different content coverage than arXiv.org. This paper addresses both differences. As far as the business model is concerned, RePEc is an instance of a concept that I call the "Open Library". An Open Library is open in two ways. It is open for contribution (third parties can add to it), and it is open for implementation (many user services may be created). Conventional libraries---including most digital libraries---are closed in both directions. As far as the content coverage is concerned, RePEc seeks to build a relational dataset about scholarly resources and other aspects of reality that are related to these resources. This basically means identifying all authors, all papers and all institutions that work in economics. Such an ambitious project can only be achieved if the cost to collect metadata is decentralized and low, and if the benefits to supply metadata are large. The Open Library provides a framework where these conditions are fulfilled. This paper is available online at http://openlib.org/home/krichel/myers.html. # The work discussed here has received financial support by the Joint Information Systems Committee of the UK Higher Education Funding Councils through its Electronic Library Programme I am grateful to Ivan V. Kurmanov for comments on an earlier version. This paper was presented at the PEAK conference at the University of Michigan on 2000--03--24. On 2001--03--05, I made cosmetic changes to this document as suggested by Jeffrey K. MacKie-Mason. These suggestions have much improved the readability of the paper without updating its contents.

Cruz, J. M. B. and T. Krichel (2000). "Cataloging economics preprints: an introduction to the RePEc project." Journal of Internet Cataloging 3(2/3): 227-41.

Article included in Part 2 of a special issue devoted to the theme: Metadata and organizing educational resources on the Internet. Cataloguing resources that assist in educating a domain specific community can require a finer level of granularity than objects that are to be accessed by a more general domain community and can become a costly process. One possible approach towards cataloguing such resources is to arrange for a community of providers involved in cataloguing the materials that they provide. Introduces RePEc [URL:http://netec.wust.edu/RePEc], initially standing for Research Papers in Economics, as an example for such an approach. RePEc is mainly a catalogue of research papers in Economics and is based on a set of over 80 archives, which all work independently but are interoperable. Describes the method used to evaluate the success in providing data of reasonable quality through a decentralized approach. (The authors may be contacted by electronic mail at [mailto:jose.barrueco@uv.es] and [mailto:T.Krichel@surrey.ac.uk]). (Copies of this article are available for a fee from the Haworth Document Delivery Service, Haworth Press, Inc., 10 Alice Street, Binghamton, New York, 13904-1580, USA. E-Mail: [mailto:getinfo@haworthpressinc.com,] Web site: [URL:http://www.haworthpressinc.com]. (Original abstract - amended)

Baum, C. (2000). imfocpcvt.pl, a script converting html data to ReDIF, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/imfocpcvt.html

This perl program grabs a html file and generates the ReDIF data used in RePEc. Of course, all is dependent on how the data is organized in html, but this script can be adapted to specific needs. This version is adapted for the web pages of the IMF Occasional Papers.

Baum, C. (2000). ectj.pl, a script converting html data to ReDIF, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/ectj.html

This perl program grabs a html file and generates the ReDIF data used in RePEc. Of course, all is dependent on how the data is organized in html, but this script can be adapted to specific needs. This version is adapted for the web pages of the Econometrics Journal.

Barrueco Cruz, J. M., M. J. R. Klink, et al. (2000). Personal data in a large digital library. 4th European Conference on Research and Advanced Technology for Digital Libraries. Lisboa (Portugal). http://eprints.rclis.org/archive/00000435/

The RePEc Economics library offers the largest distributed source of freely downloadable scientific research reports in the world. RePEc also contains details about Economics institutions, publication outlets and people working in the field. All this data forms a large relational dataset. In this paper we describe HoPEc, a system that allows to implement access control records for personal data within RePEc. The bulk of these data describe the authors of documents. These data are maintained by the authors themselves.We discuss the technical and social aspects of this system.

Shuetrim, G. (1999). Perl CGI script to provide a web based interface to a local RePEc Archive, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/shuetrim.html

Kurmanov, I. (1999). ReDIF-perl package, including rech and rr.pm, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/redif-perl.html

This package contains the ReDIF parser and the data checking script rech. The ReDIF parser is a set of Perl modules that allow to create ReDIF data processing tools easy (at least it was the aim). Rech is a checking and error-reporting tool for making sure your data is valid.

Krichel, T. and V. M. Lyapunov (1999). UPS ReDIF Conversion Report. The first meeting of the Open Archives Initiative. Santa Fe (New Mexico. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/work/ups_redif_conversion_report.html

The conversion of the e-print metadata dumps to ReDIF was funded by the WoPEc project (an eLib project funded by JISC) as a donation to the UPS protoproto work. The work was supervised by Thomas Krichel, the project director of WoPEc, at the University of Surrey. He opened the Acmes mailing list where persons interested in the process contributed comments. These included Sune Karlsson, Michael L. Nelson and Herbert Van de Sompel. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/work/ups_redif_conversion_report.a4.pdf

Krichel, T. and V. M. Lyapunov (1999). UPS ReDIF Conversion Report. The first meeting of the Open Archives Initiative. Santa Fe (New Mexico. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/work/ups_redif_conversion_report.html

The conversion of the e-print metadata dumps to ReDIF was funded by the WoPEc project (an eLib project funded by JISC) as a donation to the UPS protoproto work. The work was supervised by Thomas Krichel, the project director of WoPEc, at the University of Surrey. He opened the Acmes mailing list where persons interested in the process contributed comments. These included Sune Karlsson, Michael L. Nelson and Herbert Van de Sompel. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/work/ups_redif_conversion_report.a4.pdf

Karlsson, S. and T. Krichel (1999). RePEc and S-WoPEc: Internet access to electronic preprints in Economics, Electronic publishing '99: redefining the information chain - new ways and voices. Proceedings of an ICCC/IFIP conference held at the University of Karlskrona/Ronneby, Ronneby, Sweden, 10-12 May 1999. Edited by John W. T. Smith, Anders Ardo and Peter Linde. Washington, DC: ICCC Press, 1999, p.204-14. http://ideas.repec.org/p/rpc/rdfdoc/lindi.html

Paper presented at the conference: Electronic publishing '99: redefining the information chain - new ways and voices, May 1999. Electronic dissemination of Economics working papers began in 1993 with the start of the Working Papers in Economics (WoPEc) project. By March 1999 this single archive had grown into the Research Papers in Economics (RePEc) network of over 60 archives holding over 13,000 downloadable papers and over 50,000 descriptions of offline papers, as well as data about over 4,000 academic Economics departments and research institutes. An example of a national initiative within RePEc is Swedish Working Papers in Economics (S-WoPEc) at [URL:http://www.swopec.hhs.se/]. Describes the historical background before the foundation of RePEc; discusses some important aspects of RePEc, such as its structure and user services; describes the features of S-WoPEc; and outlines the benefits of participating in RePEc.

Karlsson, S. and J. M. Barrueco (1999). remi: Mirror RePEc data, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/remi.html

Perl program that Mirrors the RePEc data from participating archives. Needed to construct an end user service. Version 1.02g.

Baum, C. (1999). rjeyr.pl, a script converting html data to ReDIF, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/rjeyr.html

This perl program grabs a html file and generates the ReDIF data used in RePEc. Of course, all is dependent on how the data is organized in html, but this script can be adapted to specific needs. This version is adapted for the web pages of the Rand Journal of Economics.

Barrueco, J. M. (1999). rewe : ReDIF to web, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/rewe.html

This perl script enables to generate html pages from ReDIF data. It is used to create end user services like IDEAS, WoPEc and BibEc

Barrueco, J. M. (1999). nere (New ReDIF), RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/nere.html

This perl script finds the new additions to the RePEc data set.

Barrueco, J. M. (1999). sere, RePEc Team. http://ideas.repec.org/c/rpc/script/sere.html

This perl script takes a file with ReDIF templates, makes the NEP reports, and send them to the list moderators. To be used with nere (RePEc:rpc:script:nere)

Barrueco Cruz, J. M. and T. Krichel (1999) Cataloging Economics preprints: an introduction to the RePEc project http://ideas.repec.org/p/rpc/rdfdoc/shankari.html

Cataloging scientific papers creates a new educational resource. Collecting that data is a costly process to achieve and manage. In particular the level of granularity that is required is finer than say for a collection of web sites. One possible approach towards cataloging these resources is to get a community of providers involved in cataloging the materials that they provide. This paper introduces RePEc of http://netec.wustl.edu/RePEc, as an example for such an approach. RePEc is mainly a catalog of research papers in Economics. It is based on set of over 80 archives which all work independently but yet are interoperable. They together provide data about almost 60,000 preprints and over 10,000 published articles.

Barrueco Cruz, J. M. and T. Krichel (1999) Distributed Cataloging on the Internet: the RePEc project http://ideas.repec.org/p/rpc/rdfdoc/jagt.html

Cataloging online documents requires a finer level of granularity than many other objects. Collecting that data is a costly process to achieve and manage. One possible approach towards cataloging these resources is to get a community of providers involved in cataloging the materials that they provide. This paper introduces RePEc of http://netec.wustl.edu/RePEc, as an example for such an approach. RePEc is mainly a catalog of research papers in Economics. In May 1999, it is based on set of over 80 archives which all work independently but yet are interoperable. They together provide data about almost 60,000 preprints and over 10,000 published articles. In principle each institution participating in RePEc provides its own papers by providing and maintaining an archive. The key issue of the paper is to evaluate the success of that decentralized approach in providing data of reasonable quality

Zimmermann, C. (1998) Tips and tricks for RePEc archive maintainers http://ideas.repec.org/p/rpc/rdfdoc/maintain.html

Various tips and tricks for optimizing or debugging the data provided by RePEc archives.

Weintraub, E. R. (1998). "Archiving the History of Economics." Journal of Economic Literature 36(3): 1496-1501. http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0022-0515%28199809%2936%3A3%3C1496%3AATHOE%3E2.0.CO%3B2-H

Archival materials offer a rich source of information for understanding the history of economics. The correspondence, lecture notes, unpublished reports and drafts, and oral histories contained in the archives of prominent economists offer a valuable glimpse into the training of economists, as well as the process by which research agendas develop. The paper provides an overview of such resources, taking the Duke University Special Collections Library's Economists' Papers Project as an exemplar. The authors also offer guidance for those economists interested in preserving their collected papers for repositories.

Krichel, T. (1998) Access to Scientific Literature on the WWW: the RePEc concept http://ideas.repec.org/p/rpc/rdfdoc/concepts.html

This documents describes what RePEc is all about: constructing a database about all aspects of research in economics.

Krichel, T. (1997-). Guildford Protocol. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/acmes/root/docu/guilp.html

This document is the Guildford protocol. It is named after the town where it has been written. The protocol provides a set of rules for the publication and exchange of documents on the internet. It could be implemented in any group that wishes to distribute documents on the internet.

Zimmermann, C. (1997) Step-by-step instructions for the creation on an RePEc archive http://ideas.repec.org/p/rpc/rdfdoc/stepbystep.html

Easy instructions on how to set up a fully functional RePEc archive

Wichmann, T. (1997). "NetEc - The Economist's Internet Library." The Economic Journal 107(444): 1620-1626. http://www.berlecon.de/tw/netec.pdf

NetEc is an Internet project – maintained by volunteers – which over the past several years has developed into a valuable electronic resource for economists. NetEc is actually an umbrella organisation bringing together six smaller Internet projects collecting: bibliographic information about electronic versions of economics working papers (WoPEc), about printed working papers (BibEc), computer code and add-ons to software packages used by economists (CodEc), links to all kinds of economics information on the Internet (WebEc), links to business information (BizEc), and Internet homepage publications of economists (HoPEc). NetEc’s original site on the Internet can be found in the UK at http://netec.mcc.ac.uk/NetEc.html. In addition, mirrors exist in the United States (http://netec.wustl.edu/NetEc.html) and in Japan (http://netec.ier.hit-u.ac.jp/NetEc.html). They provide faster access to the information from the respective regions. http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0013-0133%28199709%29107%3A444%3C1620%3ANEEIL%3E2.0.CO%3B2-V

Varian, H. R. (1997). "The AEA's Electronic Publishing Plans: A Progress Report." The Journal of Economic Perspectives 11(3): 95-104. http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0895-3309%28199722%2911%3A3%3C95%3ATAEPPA%3E2.0.CO%3B2-G

Krichel, T., J. M. Barrueco Cruz, et al. (1997). ReDIF version 1. http://openlib.org/home/krichel/acmes/root/docu/redif_1.html

This document describes version 1 of the Research Documents Information Format (ReDIF). ReDIF version 1 will be referred to as ReDIF throughout. ReDIF is a metadata format to describe the output aspects of academic disciplines. But that we mean the scientific documents that are produced, the channels through which they are made public, the authors who produce the documents and the editors who control the output channels, etc as well as the institutions that support this process. ReDIF does not aim at a very elaborate description of these items. Its overriding design goal is simplicity. It is aimed primarily for the use by academics as a self-documentation tool. The idea is that if academics can make a better documentation of their work themselves, then the need for expensive intermediation between academics is reduced. ReDIF is supposed to be understood and deployed by people with no formal cataloging training.

Krichel, T. (1997). "WoPEc: Electronic working papers in Economics Services." Ariadne(8). http://www.ariadne.ac.uk/issue8/wopec/

Krichel, T. (1997). "About NetEc, with special reference to WoPEc." CHEER 11(1): 19-24. http://econltsn.ilrt.bris.ac.uk/cheer/ch11_1/ch11_1p19.htm

This is a general article about NetEc. NetEc is a collection of projects that aim to improve the scholarly communication in Economics via electronic media. Its aim is to make available on the internet as much information relevant to Economics as possible. Instead of being hidden in printed publication where it is difficult to find and expensive to get hold of, NetEc proposes to open Economics to the public by improving both current awareness and access to publications and other data. More generally NetEc aims to fight the division of the world into informationally rich and poor. Alternative location http://netec.mcc.ac.uk/doc/hisn.html

Krichel, T. (1997) Unix Installation http://ideas.repec.org/p/rpc/rdfdoc/unixinstall.html

This document describes the installation of an active RePEc archive on a Unix system, that is a system that also mirror RePEc data. It is now completely outdated and its online version has been withdrawn.

Goffe, W. L. and R. P. Parks (1997). "The Future Information Infrastructure in Economics." The Journal of Economic Perspectives 11(3): 75-94. http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0895-3309%28199722%2911%3A3%3C75%3ATFIIIE%3E2.0.CO%3B2-J

Computers have greatly improved the lives of economists. Computer networks may dramatically change the way we work. Already we have seen hints with electronic mail, mailing lists, on-line card catalogs, access to U.S. government data, and the start of an on-line working paper culture (nearly 2,000 on-line working papers at last count; see [WPA] and [WoPEc]). This summer, back issues of the AER will go on-line, and across academia, there are almost 200 peer-reviewed electronic journals [VLib] with hundreds of U.K. journals going on-line this year [Hitchcock]. This world exists only in embryonic form---we are now at a cusp point, and any number of outcomes are possible. One possible future continues current practices with little improvement in access to information, albeit with that information traveling over networks.However, we argue that a different future, with more easily accessed information, is more consistent with academic traditions and values, and is now possible. Thus, this paper is a normative, conceptual view of how computer networks should change the way we work. It is also a brief overview; more details can be found in [Okerson], [Scovill], [Peek], [Hitchcock], and many issues of the ``Journal of Electronic Publishing'' [JEP]. A very extensive bibliography is [Bailey]. In addition, rather than a formal model, this paper is intended to start a debate in our profession.

Cruz, J. M. B., J. A. C. Garcia, et al. (1996). "Grey literature, copyright and new technologies."

Paper presented at the GL'95, the Second International Conference on Grey Literature. Reviews the coverage of grey literature by online and other electronic databases and discusses the problems caused by the fact that grey literature is not covered by legal deposit requirements and therefore by copyright law. Predicts that the growth of electronic networks, such as the Internet and World Wide Web (WWW), and the trend for scientists and engineers to depend less on published periodicals, will bring about changes in this situation.

Cruz, J. M. B., J. A. C. Garcia, et al. (1996). "Preprints: communication through electronic nets. An example of bibliographic control."

Paper presented at the GL'95, the Second International Conference on Grey Literature. Lists the characteristics of preprints of scientific articles that qualify them as grey literature and notes the way in which advances in electronic publishing, such as the Internet and World Wide Web (WWW) are modifying the traditional role of preprints in the process of scientific communication. Concludes that electronic networks have radically changed the conventional preprint distribution, shortening to minutes the time a working paper needs to go from the author to the user.

Cleave, G. E. (1996). "Project management in grey literature: a study based on the development of the Working Papers Project at the University of Warwick."

Paper presented at the GL'95, the Second International Conference on Grey Literature. The working papers project at Warwick University, UK, has been in continuous development for over 25 years. It aims to provide awareness of and access to working papers in economics and management, which are of outstanding importance for researchers. 3 factors were identified as crucial to the success of the project: collection and cataloguing ; current awareness services, and document delivery. Reviews the changes that have taken place with regard to these factors and outlines future developments, including involvement in the Institute of Management and Bowker-Saur IMID PLUS CD-ROM database and the HELECON-International CD-ROM database. Considers both the effects of technological and commercial change on the development of the project. Sets out the characteristics of the collection and its users. Original abstract-amended.

Krichel, T. and T. Wichmann (1994). "Internet Primer for Economists: I. Introduction." The Economic Journal 104(427): 1496-1523. http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0013-0133%28199411%29104%3A427%3C1496%3AIPFEII%3E2.0.CO%3B2-7

Fletcher, J., Ed. (1984). Information Sources in Economics.

First edition published as The Use of Economics Literature 1971

Fletcher, J. (1983). "The economics working papers collection at the University of Warwick Library." Interlending and Document Supply 11(2): 62-64 s.

A growing awareness of the importance of a particular type of grey literature in the field of economics, termed workrng papers, gave rise to the setting up of the special collection of economics working papers at Warwick University Library. Working papers are defined as drafts of potential periodical articles, papers given at conferences or seminars, or other research results, not yet in their final form for publication in conventional media.

Koch, J. E. and J. M. Pask (1980). "Working papers in academic business libraries." College and Research Libraries 41(6): 517-523.

Fletcher, J. (1972). "A View of the Literature of Economics." Journal of Documentation 28(4): 283-295.

Fletcher, J., Ed. (1971). The Use of Economics Literature. London.

Charles, C. H. and E. S. William (1968). "Growth of the Professional Literature in Economics and Other Fields, and Some Implications." American Documentation 19(1): 18. http://proquest.umi.com/pqdweb?did=640632761&Fmt=7&clientId=15386&RQT=309&VName=PQD

As is well known, the output of scholarly literature has been increasing rapidly. This point is amply driven home by the fact that there are now more than 3,500 journals in the physical sciences and technology alone (1, p. 190). Since library space, information retrieval problems, and reading time tend to increase with the size of the literature, it should be useful to examine the growth patterns of the literature in various fields.